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Amy Kovac-Ashley

M.S. (Columbia University)
Visiting Assistant Professor
Managing director for strategic partnerships and outreach
amy.kovacashley@mail.wvu.edu
304-293-8548
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Julia Fraustino

Amy Kovac-Ashley joined the WVU Reed College of Media in August 2015. She teaches in the journalism program and is the managing director of the college’s Media Innovation Center.

Prior to coming to WVU, Kovac-Ashley was the assistant dean of Georgetown University’s Master of Professional Studies in Journalism program, where she focused on curriculum and faculty development, media partnerships and careers. Under her leadership, the program increased its digital journalism offerings and industry ties and experienced growth in admissions applications and enrollment of students. She was also the adviser to the Georgetown student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and served on the Dean’s Council, the body that reviews student appeals. Kovac-Ashley has more than a dozen years of experience as a professional journalist. As a regional editor for Patch.com, she helped launch the D.C./Baltimore region of sites. Through a partnership she helped foster between Patch and the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism, she co-created and team-taught a Capstone class that focused on hyperlocal and niche journalism.

Before that, Kovac-Ashley was the first social media editor for The Washington Post/washingtonpost.com, where she also worked on the interactivity and local news desks. She has worked at The Roanoke Times, where she was part of the team that covered the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007; the Herald News in Northern New Jersey; Foreign Policy magazine, where she was part of the team that won a National Magazine Award for General Excellence in 2003, the first time FP won this award; and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. Kovac-Ashley holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. A native of Southern California, she graduated from Stanford University with a master’s degree in Russian and East European studies and a bachelor’s degree in history.